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My Genome: Our Future, Brussel

Atomium in Brussel.
© Kevin Bergenhenegouwen
datum 12 februari 2019 - 13 februari 2019
plaats Brussel, België
locatie Brussels, Belgium Toon locatie
organisatie Europese Commissie (EC)

The JRC will organise a high-level conference titled "Integrating genomics into personalised healthcare: a science-for-policy perspective" on the 12th and 13th of February, 2019.

Registrations are closed but you can apply to be added on our waiting list (see below).

This conference will bring together experts from around the world to discuss the potential of genomics in the prevention, diagnostics, and therapy for cancer and the new opportunities it may bring for citizens and patients in the EU.

The discussions will also highlight challenges to the implementation and uptake of genomics-based screening and diagnosis in health systems and map the appropriate actions.

The focus will be on supporting patient-centric policies, covering important aspects such as quality assurance, ownership and security of the genetic information produced, ethics and the impact of the genomics market on healthcare systems.

The conference will promote cross-disciplinary interactions between specialists in genetics and genomics, health professionals, decision-makers, patient organisations and other relevant stakeholders.

The event supports:

Conference themes of interest

The conference will be structured into four sessions, reflecting three main themes.

Theme I. Genomics for health: the breast cancer example

What is "genomics"? How does it apply to health? What's in it for me - as a citizen?

Starting from the use of genomics, in the field of breast cancer, the theme will stimulate a broader discussion to illustrate the evolution of genetic testing and gene panels, with a particular focus on:

  • How this facilitates bridging the application of whole-genome sequencing into clinical practice.
  • How genomics can support better diagnostics, targeted treatments, disease monitoring and clinical follow-up.

Theme II. The public health perspective

What are the opportunities and challenges of implementing genomics approaches in public health? Who are the actors, and what are the actions that are needed for this implementation to succeed?

The theme will foster a debate on public health topics like evidence-generating healthcare, harmonisation, reproducibility, data interoperability, quality and security in the context of genomics.

It will also map out how the process of translating genomic data into the clinical setting could be facilitated, and explain the impact that the genomics market has on healthcare systems.

Theme III. The citizen and patient perspective

How is genomics experienced by people, as patients, consumers, citizens? How will the citizen and the patient be approached and involved? How is the individual's information valued, and who will use and have access to it?

The theme will propose a consideration and reflection on regulatory and ethical challenges with a particular focus on the societal and legal implications for the citizen. It will highlight the importance of literacy, both from citizens, patients and health professionals, and discuss ways to mobilise citizen engagement.

Conference organiser

European Commission's Joint Research Centre, Retieseweg 11, 2440 Geel, Belgium

Target audience

The conference aims to include a varied, non-scientific audience of about 350 people, including:

  • Policy makers from the relevant European Commission departments (SANTE, CONNECT, JUST, RTD, GROW), the Scientific Advice Mechanism (SAM) and the European Political Strategy Centre (EPSC)
  • Steering Group on health promotion, disease prevention and management of non-communicable diseases (SGPP) and other SANTE working/expert groups
  • National public health authorities
  • Researchers and clinicians
  • Citizens and patients representatives
  • European Medicines Agency and its national equivalents
  • Industry representatives
  • Members of national and EU parliaments

Registration

The number of participants is restricted to 350.

Registrations are closed but you can apply to be added on our waiting list.

Please apply online to be added on our waiting list. We will confirm your registration when we receive cancellation following the first-come, first-served basis.

Programme

/jrc/en/file/document/179155programme

programme

Tuesday 12 February 2019

08:00 - 09:15 Participants registration and welcome coffee

09:30 - 10:00 Institutional addresses

Chair: Chairs Vladimír Šucha, Director General, European Commission, Directorate-General Joint Research Centre, Belgium

Martin Seychell, Deputy Director General, European Commission, Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety, Belgium

Irene Norstedt, Acting Direcor, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, Belgium

10:00 - 13:15 Session I: Setting the stage

What is "genomics"? How does it apply to health? What's in it for me, as a citizen?

This session will illustrate the evolution of genetic testing and how the application of sequencing technologies led to the discovery of genetic variants and subsequently to the eventual characterisation of disease variants. This ultimately may lead to applications in clinical practice and this session will highlight how genomics can support better diagnostics, targeted treatments, disease monitoring and clinical follow-up.

Chair: Joris Vermeesh, University of Leuven, Belgium

Co-chair: Marco Marsella, European Commission, Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, Luxembourg

Rapporteur: Jacques Simard, Université Laval, Canada

10:00 - 11:00 Keynote presentations

10:00 - 10:30 Big data in healthcare and biology, opportunities and challenges

Ewan Birney, European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute, United Kingdom

10:30 - 11:00 From clinical genetics to genomic medicine: a brief history

Sir John Burn, Newcastle University, United Kingdom

11:00 - 11:30 Coffee break

11:30 - 13:15 Moderated panel discussion with:

Peter Devilee, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands

Mark Bale, Genomics England, United Kingdom

Denis Horgan, European Alliance for Personalised Medicine, Belgium

Peter Kapitein, Inspire2live,The Netherlands

13:15 - 14:45 Lunch break

14:15 - 14:45 Flash talks by young health innovators

Chair: Mauro Giacca, King’s College London, United Kingdom

14:15 - 14:30 Reinventing ADCs - Catalyzing the discovery and development of nextgeneration

Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs) for targeted therapies

Dominik Schumacher, Tubulis Technologies, Germany

14:30 - 14:45 From genetics to metabolism, a translational effort towards cancer diagnostics

Francesco Gatto, Elypta, Sweden

14:45 - 18:00 Session II: Genomics - opportunities and challenges

What are the opportunities and challenges of implementing genomics approaches in public health?

This session will discuss concepts such as evidence-generating healthcare, harmonisation, reproducibility, as well as data interoperability, quality and security.

Chair: Giorgio Stanta, University of Trieste, Italy

Co-chair: Irene Norstedt, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, Belgium

Rapporteur: Rolf Apweiler, European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), United Kingdom

14:45 - 15:45 Keynote presentations

14:45 - 15:15 Data sharing in genomic medicine: opportunities and challenges

Jan Korbel, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Germany

15:15 - 15:45 The internet for social machines

Barend Mons, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), The Netherlands

15:45 - 16:15 Break

16:15 - 18:00 Moderated panel discussion with

Rodrigo Dienstmann, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Spain

Stefan Fröhling, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Germany

Serena Scollen, European Life-Science Infrastructure For Biological Information (ELIXIR), United Kingdom

18:00 End of day 1

18:00 - 19:00 Refreshments

Wednesday 13 February 2019

08:00 - 08:45 Particpants registration

08:45 - 12:00 Session III: The public health perspective

Who are the actors, and what are the actions that are needed for the implementation of genomics in healthcare to succeed?

The session will map how the process of translation of genomics data to the clinical setting could be facilitated, and explain the impact the genomics market has on healthcare systems.

Chair: Tit Albreht, National Institute of Public Health (NIJZ), Slovenia

Co-chair: Elke Anklam, European Commission, Directorate-General Joint Research Centre, Belgium

Rapporteur: Marc Van den Bulcke, Sciensano, Belgium

08:45 - 09:45 Keynote presentation

The future of oncology research in Horizon Europe

Thierry Philip, Institut Curie and European Organization of Cancer Institutes (OECI), France

09:45 - 10:15 Coffee break

10:15 - 12:00 Moderated panel discussion with

Nazneen Rahman, Independent healthcare consultant, United Kingdom

Jacek Gronwald, Pomeranian Medical University (PMU), Poland

Jan-Ingvar Jönsson, Swedish Research Council, Sweden

Laura van't Veer, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, USA

12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break

13:00 - 13:30 Flash talks: A focus on genomics for rare diseases

Chair: Julia Wilson, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom

13:00 - 13:15 SOLVE-RD: a diagnosis for every rare disease patient

Han Brunner, Radboud University Medical Center (Radboudumc), The Netherlands

13:15 - 13:30 European joint programme on rare diseases bringing genomic tools and discoveries to clinics

Daria Julkowska, National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), France

13:30 - 16:45 Session IV: The citizen and patient perspective

How is genomics experienced by people, as patients, consumers, citizens? How will the citizen and the patient be approached and involved? How is the individual's information valued, and who will use and have access to it?

This session will discuss regulatory and ethical challenges and considerations, with a particular focus on the societal and legal implications for the citizen. It will highlight the importance of literacy, both from citizens, patients and health professionals, and highlight the ways to mobilise citizen engagement.

Chair: Peter Goodhand, Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, Canada

Co-chair: Ioana-Maria Gligor, European Commission, Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety, Belgium

Rapporteur: Rita Schmutzler, Uniklinik Köln, Germany

13:30 - 14:30 Keynote presentations

13:30 - 14:00 Citizen and patient perspectives: The Quebec experience

Bartha Knoppers, McGill University, Canada

14:00 - 14:30 How biobanking can help deliver on the promises of personalised medicine

Francesco Florindi, Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure - European Research Infrastructure Consortium (BBMRI-ERIC), Austria

14:30 - 15:00 Break

15:00 - 16:45 Moderated panel discussion with

Jane Kaye, Centre for Law, Health and Emerging Technologies (HeLEX), University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Bettina Borisch, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Jean-Pierre Hubaux, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

Andres Metspalu, University of Tartu, Institute of Genomics, Estonia

16:45 - 17:30 Final keynote presentation

Chair: Guy Van den Eede, European Commission, Directorate-General Joint Research Centre, Belgium

Final keynote presentation: Teri Manolio, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA

Genomic medicine programs of the National Human Genome Research Institute

17:30 Closing of the conference

Event app

You can download the conference app by clicking on http://scan.conference4me.psnc.pl/get/?config=mygenome2019.

As part of our eco-friendly approach to reduce the use of paper, the full programme will not be printed.

Practical information

  • Venue

The conference is held at the NH Brussels Bloom Hotel, Rue Royale 250, 1210 Brussels, Belgium. The hotel is a 15-minute walk from the historic city centre. It has on-site indoor parking and the daily rate is 27€ (24 hours); you can park your car on the level (-1) or (-2), with the latter being more spacious.

Map to locate the NH Brussels Bloom Hotel

NH Brussels Bloom Hotel web site

How to get there?

  • It takes about 20 min from Brussels Zaventem Airport to Brussels North railway station and the train leaves every 10 min.
  • From Brussels North railway station, it's about 15 min walk to the NH Brussels Bloom Hotel. Map
  • From Brussels North railway station, it's about10 min walk through the rue du Progrès to reach the metro line 2 or 6, direction "Simonis" or "Roi Baudouin" at "Rogier". Alight at the metro "Botanique" and walk for 5 min through the Rue Royal until you get to NH Brussels Bloom Hotel, located on your left. Map of the Brussels metro lines

Taxi

You can take a taxi:

  • • 
    from Brussels Zaventem airport to the NH Brussels Bloom hotel. It takes about 25 min (depending on the traffic) and cost around 30-35€.
  • • 
    from Brussels North railway station to the NH Brussels Bloom hotel. It takes about 5 min and cost around 10-15€.
  • • 
    from Brussels South railway station to the NH Brussels Bloom hotel. It takes about 10 min and cost around 16-21€.

We recommend you to take a taxi for late arrival at the Brussels North railway station.

You can contact the below companies:

Visit Brussels: https://visit.brussels/en

  • Conference timing

12 February 2019

08:00 - 09:15 Registration

09:30 - 10:00 Institutional addresses

10:00 - 13:15 Session I: Setting the stage

13:15 - 14:00 Lunch

14:00 - 14:30 Flash talks by EU Innovation winners

14:30 - 18:00 Session II: Genomics - Opportunities and challenges

18:00 End of day 1 (Refreshments)

13 February 2019

08:00 - 08:45 Registration

08:45 - 12:00 Session III: The Public Health perspective

12:00 - 13:15 Lunch

12:45 - 13:15 Flash talks by EU Innovation winners

13:15 - 16:30 Session IV: the Citizen and Patient perspective

16:30 - 17:30 Final keynote presentation

17:30 End of conference

  • Accommodation

Participants are responsible for organising their travel and accommodation in Brussels; the European Commission will not reimburse these expenses.

/jrc/en/file/document/177254List of hotels

List of hotels

offering a reduced rate for a limited number of rooms during the conference, please pay attention to the deadlines.

  • Catering

The European Commission will provide buffet lunches, coffee/tea breaks and water for the participants at the conference premises.

We will not be able to cater for all needs, but different food options will be available on the buffets.

  • Wifi

Wireless internet access will be made available to participants free-of-charge throughout the venue.

Contact

If you have further questions, please contact JRC-genomicsandcancer@ec.europa.eu

Last update: 4 February 2019


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Europese Commissie (EC)

Deze instelling van de Europese Unie kan worden beschouwd als het 'dagelijks bestuur' van de EU. De leden van de Europese Commissie worden 'eurocommissarissen' genoemd. Elke eurocommissaris is verantwoordelijk voor één of meerdere beleidsgebieden. Momenteel zijn er 28 eurocommissarissen, voor elke lidstaat één. Samen vormen zij het college van eurocommissarissen. De eurocommissarissen moeten het belang van de Europese Unie als geheel behartigen, niet dat van hun eigen land.

De Europese Commissie mag als enige EU-instelling wetsvoorstellen indienen; zij heeft het zogenaamde recht van initatief. Daarnaast controleert de Commissie of de Europese wetgeving juist wordt toegepast in de lidstaten, onderhandelt zij in internationale organisaties als de Wereldhandelsorganisatie (WTO) over de handel van de Unie met het 'buitenland' en is zij verantwoordelijk voor het beheer van de Europese begroting van ongeveer 140 miljard euro per jaar.

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