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EU-rapport: kwart EU-kinderen hoge risico op armoede en sociale uitsluiting (en)

Met dank overgenomen van Eurostat (ESTAT), gepubliceerd op dinsdag 26 februari 2013.

In the EU27, children are at greater risk of poverty or social exclusion than the rest of the population. In 2011, 27% of children aged less than 18 were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU27 , compared with 24% of adults (aged 18-64) and 21% of the elderly (aged 65 and over). Persons at risk of poverty or social exclusion are those who are at least in one of the following three conditions: at-risk-of-poverty 1, severely materially deprived 1 or living in households with very low work intensity 1 .

In a majority of Member States, children are more affected by at least one of the three forms of poverty or social exclusion than the other two age groups. In 2011, the highest shares of those aged less than 18 who were at risk of poverty or social exclusion were registered in Bulgaria (52%), Romania (49%), Latvia (44%), Hungary (40%) and Ireland (38% in 2010), and the lowest in Sweden , Denmark and Finland (all 16%), followed by Slovenia (17%), the Netherlands (18%) and Austria (19%).

These figures come from a report 2 published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union and are based on data from the EU Statistics on Income and Living Condition (EU-SILC) survey 3. Among others, the report looks at several factors affecting child poverty, such as the composition of the household in which the children live and the labour market situation of their parents.

Almost one child in two with parents of low education level is at r isk of poverty in the EU27

Looking in more detail at monetary poverty, almost half of all children whose parents had a low education level 4 (at the most lower secondary education) were at risk of poverty in the EU27 in 2011, compared with 22% of children residing with parents who had a medium education level 4 (at the most upper secondary education) and 7% of children with parents with a higher education level 4 (tertiary education).

In all Member States, the risk of poverty for children decreased when the education level of their parents was high. The largest differences between the share of children at risk of poverty who lived in a low and in a high education level household were found in Romania (78% of children in a low education level household compared with 2% in a high education level household), the Czech Republic (76% and 5%), Slovakia (77% and 7%), Bulgaria (71% and 2%) and Hungary (68% and 3%), and the smallest differences in Denmark (17% and 5%) and Finland (24% and 6%).

Almost one child in three with a migrant background is at risk of poverty in the EU27

In the EU27 , children who have a migrant background 5 , meaning that at least one parent was born in another country than the current country of residence, were at greater risk of monetary poverty than children whose parents were native born 5 . In 2011, 32% of children residing with at least one foreign born parent were at risk of poverty in the EU27 , compared with 18% of children whose parents were native born.

This was the case in a majority of Member States. In Estonia , Hungary and Malta children with native born parents had a higher risk of poverty, while there was almost no difference between the two groups in the Czech Republic .

With regard to children who lived with at least one foreign born parent, the share of those at risk of poverty varied significantly between Member States in 2011, ranging from 15% in the Czech Republic , 17% in Estonia and 18% in Malta to 46% in Spain , 43% in Greece and 39% in France . The share of children at risk of poverty who lived with native born parents was lowest in Denmark and Austria (both 8%) and highest in Romania (33%).

At risk of poverty or social exclusion 1 by age group, 2011 (%)

 
 

Total population

Children

(less than 18)

Adults

(18-64)

Elderly

(65 and over)

EU27 *

24.2

27.0

24.3

20.5

Belgium

21.0

23.3

20.0

21.6

Bulgaria

49.1

51.8

45.2

61.1

Czech Republic

15.3

20.0

15.1

10.7

Denmark

18.9

16.0

20.5

16.6

Germany

19.9

19.9

21.3

15.3

Estonia

23.1

24.8

24.2

17.0

Ireland **

29.9

37.6

29.7

12.9

Greece

31.0

30.4

31.6

29.3

Spain

27.0

30.6

27.2

22.3

France

19.3

23.0

20.1

11.5

Italy

28.2

32.3

28.4

24.2

Cyprus

23.5

21.8

20.8

40.4

Latvia

40.1

43.6

40.9

33.2

Lithuania

33.4

33.4

33.6

32.5

Luxembourg

16.8

21.7

17.6

4.7

Hungary

31.0

39.6

31.7

18.0

Malta

21.4

25.8

20.1

21.5

Netherlands

15.7

18.0

17.0

6.9

Austria

16.9

19.2

16.2

17.1

Poland

27.2

29.8

27.0

24.7

Portugal

24.4

28.6

23.2

24.5

Romania

40.3

49.1

39.0

35.3

Slovenia

19.3

17.3

18.7

24.2

Slovakia

20.6

26.0

20.6

14.5

Finland

17.9

16.1

18.0

19.8

Sweden

16.1

15.9

15.4

18.6

United Kingdom

22.7

26.9

21.4

22.7

Iceland

13.7

16.6

14.3

4.5

Norway

14.6

13.0

15.9

11.4

Switzerland

17.2

18.9

13.9

28.3

Croatia

32.7

32.2

32.5

34.0

  • Estimated

** 2010 data

Children at risk of monetary poverty 1 , 2011 (%)

 
 

By highest level of education attained by parents 4 :

By country of birth of parents 5 :

Low

Medium

High

Native-born

At least one

foreign-born

EU27 *

49.2

22.4

7.5

18.3

31.5

Belgium

50.5

22.5

6.4

12.1

33.9

Bulgaria

71.4

18.1

2.4

27.9

u

Czech Republic

76.2

16.3

5.4

15.2

14.9

Denmark

17.3

12.0

5.3

7.8

24.8

Germany

55.1

21.5

6.7

14.2

24.8

Estonia

52.8

25.4

8.2

19.7

16.9

Ireland

:

:

:

:

:

Greece

50.2

28.7

7.9

19.8

43.1

Spain

48.1

25.3

12.7

23.2

45.5

France

52.5

23.7

5.7

14.1

39.3

Italy

46.3

22.6

7.5

24.4

33.5

Cyprus

33.5

14.8

4.3

8.9

22.0

Latvia

52.8

32.8

4.8

24.6

25.3

Lithuania

64.1

34.6

9.2

23.3

37.3

Luxembourg

40.5

18.6

8.2

11.4

24.5

Hungary

67.8

18.8

2.9

22.9

21.4

Malta

31.7

11.6

4.2

21.3

17.9

Netherlands

45.7

18.4

6.7

10.9

29.6

Austria

42.2

15.5

6.1

8.4

28.1

Poland

57.1

26.7

6.9

21.5

u

Portugal

31.1

14.1

4.5

20.6

26.7

Romania

78.3

27.3

1.8

33.3

u

Slovenia

39.0

20.0

4.0

12.8

23.8

Slovakia

77.1

24.4

7.0

21.0

u

Finland

23.9

18.1

5.9

10.0

26.6

Sweden

54.4

17.0

8.3

9.5

29.1

United Kingdom

42.0

20.8

9.5

16.2

23.2

Iceland

15.6

17.1

6.2

10.2

18.7

Norway

36.1

8.8

4.4

5.7

25.3

Switzerland

43.0

21.3

6.7

12.0

22.7

Croatia

59.8

21.3

5.6

19.8

27.4

  • Estimated
  • D ata not available

u Data unreliable

  • Persons at risk of poverty or social exclusion are those falling into at least one of the following three conditions:
  • Persons at-risk-of-poverty live in a household with an equivalised disposable income below the risk-of-poverty threshold, which is set at 60% of the national median equivalised disposable income (after social transfers). The equivalised income is calculated by dividing the total household income by its size determined using the following weights: 1.0 for the first adult, 0.5 for each other household member aged 14 or over and 0.3 for each household member aged under 14.
  • Severely materially deprived persons have living conditions constrained by a lack of resources and experience at least 4 out of the 9 following deprivation items: cannot afford 1) to pay rent/mortgage or utility bills on time, 2) to keep home adequately warm, 3) to face unexpected expenses, 4) to eat meat, fish or a protein equivalent every second day, 5) a one week holiday away from home, 6) a car, 7) a washing machine, 8) a colour TV, or 9) a telephone (including mobile phone).
  • People living in households with very low work intensity are those aged 0-59 who live in households where the adults aged 18-59 on average worked less than 20% of their total work potential during the past year. Students are excluded.

The total number of people at risk of poverty or social exclusion is lower than the sum of the numbers of people in each of the three forms of poverty or social exclusion as some persons are affected simultaneously by more than one of these situations.

The reduction of the number of persons at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU is one of the key targets of the Europe 2020 strategy. For more information on the Europe 2020 strategy: http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/index_en.htm

  • Eurostat, Statistics in Focus , 4/2013, " Children were the age group at the highest risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2011 ", available free of charge in pdf format on the Eurostat web site.
  • The EU-SILC survey is the EU reference source for comparative statistics on income distribution, poverty and living conditions . More information can be found on the Eurostat website:

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/income_social_inclusion_living_conditions/introduction .

The reference population is all private households and their current members residing in the territory of a given Member State at the time of data collection. Persons living in collective households and in institutions are generally excluded from the target population as well as small and remote parts of the national territory amounting to no more than 2% of the national population.

  • Refers to children living in a household with one or both parents and to the highest level of education attained by (at least one of) the parents. Data are classified according to the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED): low education corresponds to ISCED levels 0-2 (pre-primary, primary and lower secondary education); medium education corresponds to ISCED levels 3 and 4 (upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education) and high education corresponds to ISCED levels 5 and 6 (tertiary education).
  • A child is considered to have a migrant background if it has at least one foreign born parent. A child is considered to live in a household with ‘native born’ parents if both parents were born in the country of residence of the household, or in the case that only one parent lives in the household, if that parent is native born.
 

Issued by: Eurostat Press Office

Julia URHAUSEN

Tel: +352-4301-33 444

eurostat-pressoffice@ec.europa.eu

Eurostat news releases on the internet: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat

For further information about the data:

Cristina LÓPEZ VILAPLANA

Tel: +352-4301-37 274

cristina.lopez-vilaplana@ec.europa.eu

Didier DUPRÉ

Tel: +352-4301-35 034

didier.dupre@ec.europa.eu


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